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Fun Questions
#1

Okay, just for fun I wanted to throw out some questions. HG and others have heard me go on, and on, and on, and on...
Anyway
1. Why isn't spiking the ball NOT intentional grounding?
  A. The quarterback is still inside the tackle box
   B. the ball does not cross the line of scrimmage
   C. there is no eligible receiver close by--and please do not tell me that the center's butt is an eligible receiver

2. Why the hell do teams punt from midfield on fourth and 1 or 2?
    A. If it is third and 8 does the team not run a play that is expected to get 9 or 10 yards? "third and 9, guess we better go ahead and punt now"
     B. Does the team not have a play that can get a yard or two?
     C. sure, punt the damn ball and watch the other team go 80 yards in a couple of minutes for a touchdown. at least going for it and failing would allow more time for the offense to do something when they get the ball back
Okay, if the play is stopped at least it was attempted
Sort of like a 2 point conversion. Good lord, tv people act like a 2 point conversion is the most difficult, controversial, logic busting thing to do

Why does a team not get points when a kicker HITS the upright. Hell, anyone can kick it through the uprights but to hit one takes real talent and skill

Ah, the fun topics at tailgating
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#2

Why doesn't the clock stop when a player goes out of bounds during the whole game? When it's the first or second quarter the clock keeps going. When does clock stoppage for out of bounds start?

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#3

(01-06-2019, 08:46 PM)Chi-town_Chief Wrote:  Why doesn't the clock stop when a player goes out of bounds during the whole game? When it's the first or second quarter the clock keeps going. When does clock stoppage for out of bounds start?

This one I know. The last 5 minutes of the half is when going out of bounds stops the clock. Technically the clock stops for a player going out of bounds the entire game but only until the refs get the ball spotted then it restarts. And this is done to quicken the game, so that we can have roughly 3 hour games and not 4.

Edit: crap I was wrong. It's the last 2 minutes of the first half and the last 5 minutes of the 2nd and OT.
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#4

(01-06-2019, 08:22 PM)Razorchief Wrote:  Okay, just for fun I wanted to throw out some questions. HG and others have heard me go on, and on, and on, and on...
Anyway
1. Why isn't spiking the ball NOT intentional grounding?
  A. The quarterback is still inside the tackle box
   B. the ball does not cross the line of scrimmage
   C. there is no eligible receiver close by--and please do not tell me that the center's butt is an eligible receiver

2. Why the hell do teams punt from midfield on fourth and 1 or 2?
    A. If it is third and 8 does the team not run a play that is expected to get 9 or 10 yards? "third and 9, guess we better go ahead and punt now"
     B. Does the team not have a play that can get a yard or two?
     C. sure, punt the damn ball and watch the other team go 80 yards in a couple of minutes for a touchdown. at least going for it and failing would allow more time for the offense to do something when they get the ball back
Okay, if the play is stopped at least it was attempted
Sort of like a 2 point conversion. Good lord, tv people act like a 2 point conversion is the most difficult, controversial, logic busting thing to do

Why does a team not get points when a kicker HITS the upright. Hell, anyone can kick it through the uprights but to hit one takes real talent and skill

Ah, the fun topics at tailgating

I actually know the answer to #1 here and have my own guess as to #2.

Spiking the football is not intentional grounding because the qb is not in imminent threat of being sacked which is one of the requirements for intentional grounding to be called. But we did run into a penalty when mahomes spiked the ball when the clock was not running at the snap which apparently does make it a penalty.

As far as going for it. All plays are designed to work, but most don't. Asking if a team does not have a play to gain 2 yards is not really helpful to the argument because I'm fairly confident all plays are designed to go for more than that. Every team also has several hail Mary type plays that are designed to work but that doesnt mean they are going to. Pretty sure most teams feel like they have a successful inside kick play but as we've seen this year, most don't work. 

TV people are stupid and living in the past (as are most coaches, and probably most fans).

Uh, because that seems silly. Of course having a specialized player to just kick a ball through some uprights for a couple points seems silly too. But would you use the same argument about basketball players hitting the rim before the ball goes through the hoop? I would rather see them add like a dart board on the nets behind the field goal posts that gave you however many points you hit rather than  giving points for hitting the bars.
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#5

Okay I have a question. In college football you are ruled down as soon as a knee or arm touches down regardless of being touched. So how come the ball isn't considered dead as soon as the holder catches it on a field goal attempt? I watched 5 seconds of a bowl game where the punter had to reach down to crash a snap and they reviewed it and said he was down where he caught it because his knee hit the ground. But Alabama can run a fake FG with their holder running the ball despite his knee being down when he catches it.
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#6

(01-07-2019, 10:42 PM)tyecopeland Wrote:  Okay I have a question. In college football you are ruled down as soon as a knee or arm touches down regardless of being touched. So how come the ball isn't considered dead as soon as the holder catches it on a field goal attempt? I watched 5 seconds of a bowl game where the punter had to reach down to crash a snap and they reviewed it and said he was down where he caught it because his knee hit the ground. But Alabama can run a fake FG with their holder running the ball despite his knee being down when he catches it.

I looked this up. There's a specific exception to this. From NCAA Rule 4, section 1:


Quote:ARTICLE 3. A live ball becomes dead and an official shall sound his whistle or declare it dead:
[...]
b. When any part of the ball carrier’s body, except his hand or foot, touches the ground or when the ball carrier is tackled or otherwise falls and loses possession of the ball as he contacts the ground with any part of his body, except his hand or foot [Exception: The ball remains alive when an offensive player has simulated a kick or at the snap is in position to kick the ball held for a place kick by a teammate. The ball may be kicked, passed or advanced by rule]

So, not only do they cover it for kicks, but also fakes. Also, really surprised such a technical document would lack an Oxford comma.
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#7

There is a penalty called "Illegal Block in the Back" . So can anyone tell me what constitutes a LEGAL Block in the Back?

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#8

(01-11-2019, 08:58 AM)HG Wrote:  There is a penalty called  "Illegal Block in the Back" .  So can anyone tell me what constitutes a LEGAL Block in the Back?

If you start a standard legal block to an opponent's front, maintain contact, and the defender tries to spin you can continue your block even in their back.
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#9

Wow. Cool. Didnt know that. That is the question that they should have asked in Hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy.

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