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AKB's Cooking / Science Experiment
#11
(05-19-2017, 07:30 PM)The_Jonas Wrote:
(05-15-2017, 07:55 AM)ChiefsChick23 Wrote: I wish we had more time to COOK-cook.

Anybody wanna come be my chef?  Smile

Hmmmm... what would it pay?

Seriously, because you can learn to cook damn near anything from youtube in the current year.  I mean it's the current year!

Dunno how I missed this before...

It's not about learning how.  It's about having TIME.
[Image: CC23sig3copy.gif]
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#12
(06-12-2017, 07:35 AM)ChiefsChick23 Wrote:
(05-19-2017, 07:30 PM)The_Jonas Wrote:
(05-15-2017, 07:55 AM)ChiefsChick23 Wrote: I wish we had more time to COOK-cook.

Anybody wanna come be my chef?  Smile

Hmmmm... what would it pay?

Seriously, because you can learn to cook damn near anything from youtube in the current year.  I mean it's the current year!

Dunno how I missed this before...

It's not about learning how.  It's about having TIME.

I think he was saying he could learn to cook what you wanted.
Reply
#13
(06-12-2017, 07:35 AM)ChiefsChick23 Wrote:
(05-19-2017, 07:30 PM)The_Jonas Wrote:
(05-15-2017, 07:55 AM)ChiefsChick23 Wrote: I wish we had more time to COOK-cook.

Anybody wanna come be my chef?  Smile

Hmmmm... what would it pay?

Seriously, because you can learn to cook damn near anything from youtube in the current year.  I mean it's the current year!

Dunno how I missed this before...

It's not about learning how.  It's about having TIME.

Yes yes, I fully understand you're busy.  

I am too, but that's why I asked how much it paid.  :p
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#14
Haven't shown you guys the process of making sous vide lemon rosemary chicken, so here it is. This is probably healthy enough to eat in my diet, and if not, fuck it. It's worth it.

Start by soaking the chicken in water with some salt and sugar in it. Do this for about 45 minutes to an hour. This is a little over 4 lbs of chicken.
[Image: 20170614_112035_zpsylmynzxn.jpg]

While that's soaking, mix garlic and kosher salt. The original recipe called for dicing garlic cloves, but I like to use minced garlic and more than the recipe calls for because I LOVE garlic.[Image: 20170614_113031_zpsxwpoybyc.jpg]

Thin slice a lemon. If I'm scaling this recipe up for more servings, rather than adding more lemon I just add some lemon juice.
[Image: 20170614_113206_zpsd5df0tue.jpg]

Warm up the immersion cooker to 146.5. It takes a while, like 20 minutes to warm up. You can save a little time by starting with hot water.
[Image: 20170614_114345_zpslqz0rc5q.jpg]

Rinse and pat dry the chicken with paper towels.
[Image: 20170614_162136_zpszx9dqilj.jpg]

Apply the garlic/kosher salt to the chicken.
[Image: 20170614_162405_zps79hapsfj.jpg]

Put the chicken and lemons in a bag. Add olive oil and rosemary. I recently saw a cooking show that had a similar recipe but totally fucked the thing up with rosemary, thyme, and parsley and it looked awesome. Will definitely try something similar sometime soon.
[Image: 20170614_163036_zpssxfa6sx8.jpg]

Then you put the bag in the pot and clip it to the side for an hour and a half. It's actually kind of neat. Sous vide requires being vacuum sealed, but rather than use an actual vacuum sealer you can just use a standard zip loc bag, dip it in the water, and water displacement will cause the air to vacate the bag, then you zip it closed. The only video I could find of it was vertically filmed, and I wouldn't wish that shit upon an enemy.

Threw some pork chops on too because I had some unexpected guests (nieces).
[Image: 20170614_180938_zpszf056zxq.jpg]

I forgot to take an actual after picture, but I accidentally burned the lemon slices, so even though this was a really good batch it didn't plate as well as my original photo (first photo in this thread). Also, sorry Razor, propane is easier for day to day cooking. Consider me Hank Hill on this issue.

My next plan is to sous vide steaks.
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#15
I see Photobucket wants me to pay for them to host images now. Sigh. Anyway, to celebrate 'postrophe 'Merica, I thought today would be a great day to do steaks and grilled corn.

I have not cooked many steaks in my life. I was always at least a little intimidated by it, worried I was going to ruin a $10+ chunk of meat, so the vast majority of the time if I wanted steak I'd go to a restaurant so I could pay even more for some crater faced teen to mess it up for me. JK, usually the crater faced teen does better than I would have.

Steaks are supposed to be one of the absolute best things to do sous vide style, because of the way it takes out a lot of the guess work, improves consistency, minimizes loss of moisture, and creates a larger pink area in rare and medium rare steaks. I found a couple very interesting online guides about cooking steaks.

The Food Lab's Complete Guide to Sous Vide Steak
The Food Lab's Definitive Guide to Grilled Steak

These are both very informative. The first obviously deals more specifically with what I'm doing, sous vide / immersion cooking steaks. The second is more about grilling steaks in general. Both taught me some of the things I've heard about cooking steaks as myths. For example it's actually better to flip meat multiple times instead of just once since it will cook more evenly, though it won't have as pretty of grill marks. The more you know.

Now, unfortunately you can't get 1-1/2" cuts of meat in this town without actually talking to a butcher and I was openly prepared for minimal human interaction today, so I went with the 1" thick cuts that were readily available. I also decided to go with t-bones because I wanted something that was bone-in.

I ended up overcooking the steaks, about medium to medium well instead of medium rare like I wanted. Still pretty good.
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#16
Don't mind if I add my 2 cents to this....

2 lbs. ground beef....
1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onion
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
2 medium jalapeno peppers, minced.
2 gloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp. Tabasco sauce
1 Tbsp. steak seasoning

Just mix them all in a bowl and you can also add some extra toppings into this, such as chopped slices of cooked bacon, diced/chopped tomatoes, or just have it as a regular bacon strip cheeseburger. Also you can add or remove the ingredients for this to your liking. I don't buy the processed foods, as it's much better to get the veggies and cut them up. Quite a chore, I know, but it's very much worth it at the end, as it gives out much better flavor.

However, I strongly recommend that after you pack the burger, and it is ready to cook, to let both sides of the hamburger set for a while on a aluminum foil on your grill. Because of the moisture from the sauce, it causes the burger to fall apart into your grill. Once you are able to determine that it will hold it together, then you can place it off the foil and onto the grill.
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#17
(07-09-2017, 04:21 PM)Coach Wrote: Don't mind if I add my 2 cents to this....

2 lbs. ground beef....
1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onion
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
2 medium jalapeno peppers, minced.
2 gloves garlic, minced
2 Tbsp. Tabasco sauce
1 Tbsp. steak seasoning

Just mix them all in a bowl and you can also add some extra toppings into this, such as chopped slices of cooked bacon, diced/chopped tomatoes, or just have it as a regular bacon strip cheeseburger. Also you can add or remove the ingredients for this to your liking. I don't buy the processed foods, as it's much better to get the veggies and cut them up. Quite a chore, I know, but it's very much worth it at the end, as it gives out much better flavor.

However, I strongly recommend that after you pack the burger, and it is ready to cook, to let both sides of the hamburger set for a while on a aluminum foil on your grill. Because of the moisture from the sauce, it causes the burger to fall apart into your grill. Once you are able to determine that it will hold it together, then you can place it off the foil and onto the grill.

I love adding fresh veggies and spices to burgers, especially cilantro. I need to do it more often. Would definitely like to try this sometime.
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#18
I meant to dig up this thread literally about a month ago, but never got around to making this post. Finally got the gumption today.

I've always been interested in making traditional Japanese ramen, or at least something close to it. Then I happened across this YouTube video by an English-speaking Japanese food vlogger.





Motivated, I tracked down the proper ingredients, including importing the Weyper off of Amazon (kind of expensive) he uses for the chicken/pork ramen broth. I did things quite a bit different in some ways, and exactly to spec in others. I also made this for far more than just 1 or 2 people, so the recipe had to be scaled up tremendously. He shows how to make the pork in a second video you can see here, he also shows how to make your own broth from scratch, but ain't nobody got time for dat.

For one, I don't have a rice cooker, but I do have a sous vide / immersion cooker and it's very much the hammer that makes everything look like a nail to me. So, I looked up sous vide recipes for pork and cooked it a little longer to be safe since it was a scaled up recipe. I've since found a more comparable recipe for cooking times. I took a big ass 4-5 lb. Boston butt pork roast, chopped off the amount I wanted to use and sliced it into about 3/4" thick cuts.

[Image: mb5t1x.jpg]

That knife btw is a high carbon stainless steel knife I got for myself off Amazon on Black Friday super cheap, like $25. It is impressively sharp. My mom used it once and instantly wanted one. I'm not very good at chopping things up, but this knife instantly made me better, no joke. A ton easier to cut stuff thinner with a sharp ass knife. Consider a badass Damascus steel chef's knife on my wishlist.

That's some of the pork butt, salted and peppered, along with peppers and green onions I decided to throw in. I also used soy sauce, sesame seed oil, fresh garlic, and fresh ginger, threw it all in a baggie and put in my sous vide machine. He recommends adding sake and mirin, but I decided to say screw it and went with what I had. After a day in the sous vide machine at around 160 degrees it was ready to sear.

[Image: 2j6actc.jpg]

So, yeah it's quite bit different than his looked. Probably closer your standard American pork roast with some oriental flavor. Very tender and was falling apart just trying to get it out of the ziploc bag.

[Image: dfzwxk.jpg]

This is basically a money shot. It was so tender that even though it wouldn't present as good, I pretty well had to go ahead and chop it up. I had a real problem with people swooping in and snagging some chunks while I got everything else prepared. Despite making plenty of the meat for the number of people, there were no leftovers of it.

[Image: 14cwguf.jpg]

I swear I'm not just trying to sell you guys on shit, but that red thing on the bottom was some impulse buy pepper coring tool at the market. If you mess with peppers a lot like I do, get one. I was genuinely surprised how well it worked scooping out the seeds and membrane.

Anyway I cut the veggies as thin as I could with the time I had. Definitely not as thin as the guy in the video by a long shot, but not bad for myself. You want thin so the veggies instantly cook when they're dropped in the broth. I made some different colored peppers, green onions, boiled eggs, and some balsamic vinegar marinated mushrooms (excellent idea NOLA, gave things a nice zip) for toppings along with the pork people could add as they pleased. Chronologically I actually did this step while waiting on the pork to finish in the immersion cooker.

The broth was super easy. Just some of that Weyper stuff, granulated garlic, soy sauce, and water brought shy of boiling. I've also made it with minced garlic instead and that may have been preferable.

The noodles are also super easy and should be the last step. They're actually called Chinese noodles if you're to look for them in the market, but the first time I made this I just grabbed a 12 pack of Maruchan ramen and tossed the flavor packets in the trash where they belong. This was fine, though the actual Chinese noodles were probably a touch better. I could see it being even better with fancier, fresher noodles.

[Image: 2hmpj40.jpg]

This isn't a very well plated example. Since I ate last (some already had seconds even) the fancy bowls were gone and almost all of the green onions and most of the mushrooms were gone. Still, if you think this looks good, one of my friends said he's been to multiple ramen restaurants and this was easily better than any of them. I never had been, but it was indeed better than a Cup-a-noodles by a mile.

I've made this a few times now. I made a gluten free chicken broth (no weyper, it has wheat flour) and rice noodles one time because a friend's girlfriend has celiac, which is a gluten allergy. Of course I made some weyper broth as well for everyone else because it's delicious.

I also made it once with far less effort by just tossing some chicken on a skillet (too cold to grill) with some adobo seasoning and chopping up whatever veggies I had on hand (red pepper and celery) with some boiled eggs. Of course it wasn't as good as pork roast cooked overnight, but it was still tasty and not bad for a last minute meal... well, under an hour, anyway.

Anyway, while this took far more effort and research than your typical 20 cent ramen package, the results are definitely worth it. Plus, everyone enjoyed getting to construct their own bowls the way they wanted which is always a plus. Give it a shot if you're into that sort of thing.
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#19
(02-18-2018, 08:16 PM)asskickingboots Wrote: I meant to dig up this thread literally about a month ago, but never got around to making this post. Finally got the gumption today.

I've always been interested in making traditional Japanese ramen, or at least something close to it. Then I happened across this YouTube video by an English-speaking Japanese food vlogger.





Motivated, I tracked down the proper ingredients, including importing the Weyper off of Amazon (kind of expensive) he uses for the chicken/pork ramen broth. I did things quite a bit different in some ways, and exactly to spec in others. I also made this for far more than just 1 or 2 people, so the recipe had to be scaled up tremendously. He shows how to make the pork in a second video you can see here, he also shows how to make your own broth from scratch, but ain't nobody got time for dat.

For one, I don't have a rice cooker, but I do have a sous vide / immersion cooker and it's very much the hammer that makes everything look like a nail to me. So, I looked up sous vide recipes for pork and cooked it a little longer to be safe since it was a scaled up recipe. I've since found a more comparable recipe for cooking times. I took a big ass 4-5 lb. Boston butt pork roast, chopped off the amount I wanted to use and sliced it into about 3/4" thick cuts.

[Image: mb5t1x.jpg]

That knife btw is a high carbon stainless steel knife I got for myself off Amazon on Black Friday super cheap, like $25. It is impressively sharp. My mom used it once and instantly wanted one. I'm not very good at chopping things up, but this knife instantly made me better, no joke. A ton easier to cut stuff thinner with a sharp ass knife. Consider a badass Damascus steel chef's knife on my wishlist.

That's some of the pork butt, salted and peppered, along with peppers and green onions I decided to throw in. I also used soy sauce, sesame seed oil, fresh garlic, and fresh ginger, threw it all in a baggie and put in my sous vide machine. He recommends adding sake and mirin, but I decided to say screw it and went with what I had. After a day in the sous vide machine at around 160 degrees it was ready to sear.

[Image: 2j6actc.jpg]

So, yeah it's quite bit different than his looked. Probably closer your standard American pork roast with some oriental flavor. Very tender and was falling apart just trying to get it out of the ziploc bag.

[Image: dfzwxk.jpg]

This is basically a money shot. It was so tender that even though it wouldn't present as good, I pretty well had to go ahead and chop it up. I had a real problem with people swooping in and snagging some chunks while I got everything else prepared. Despite making plenty of the meat for the number of people, there were no leftovers of it.

[Image: 14cwguf.jpg]

I swear I'm not just trying to sell you guys on shit, but that red thing on the bottom was some impulse buy pepper coring tool at the market. If you mess with peppers a lot like I do, get one. I was genuinely surprised how well it worked scooping out the seeds and membrane.

Anyway I cut the veggies as thin as I could with the time I had. Definitely not as thin as the guy in the video by a long shot, but not bad for myself. You want thin so the veggies instantly cook when they're dropped in the broth. I made some different colored peppers, green onions, boiled eggs, and some balsamic vinegar marinated mushrooms (excellent idea NOLA, gave things a nice zip) for toppings along with the pork people could add as they pleased. Chronologically I actually did this step while waiting on the pork to finish in the immersion cooker.

The broth was super easy. Just some of that Weyper stuff, granulated garlic, soy sauce, and water brought shy of boiling. I've also made it with minced garlic instead and that may have been preferable.

The noodles are also super easy and should be the last step. They're actually called Chinese noodles if you're to look for them in the market, but the first time I made this I just grabbed a 12 pack of Maruchan ramen and tossed the flavor packets in the trash where they belong. This was fine, though the actual Chinese noodles were probably a touch better. I could see it being even better with fancier, fresher noodles.

[Image: 2hmpj40.jpg]

This isn't a very well plated example. Since I ate last (some already had seconds even) the fancy bowls were gone and almost all of the green onions and most of the mushrooms were gone. Still, if you think this looks good, one of my friends said he's been to multiple ramen restaurants and this was easily better than any of them. I never had been, but it was indeed better than a Cup-a-noodles by a mile.

I've made this a few times now. I made a gluten free chicken broth (no weyper, it has wheat flour) and rice noodles one time because a friend's girlfriend has celiac, which is a gluten allergy. Of course I made some weyper broth as well for everyone else because it's delicious.

I also made it once with far less effort by just tossing some chicken on a skillet (too cold to grill) with some adobe and chopping up whatever veggies I had on hand (red pepper and celery) with some boiled eggs. Of course it wasn't as good as pork roast cooked overnight, but it was still tasty and not bad for a last minute meal... well, under an hour, anyway.

Anyway, while this took far more effort and research than your typical 20 cent ramen package, the results are definitely worth it. Plus, everyone enjoyed getting to construct their own bowls the way they wanted which is always a plus. Give it a shot if you're into that sort of thing.

This post fucking rules.

Also, glad the balsamic worked out for you.  Great flavor.
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#20
(02-18-2018, 09:53 PM)NOLA Wrote: This post fucking rules.

Also, glad the balsamic worked out for you.  Great flavor.

Thanks. That friend saying it was better than the restaurants' ramen specifically pointed out the mushrooms as one of the reasons it was. The roast and broth were the stars of the show, but still worth a mention.

Now that I think about it I believe I added a little sesame seed oil and oyster sauce to the mushrooms to give them an oriental hint, not enough to be overpowering though. But I've slept since then, so I could be mistaken.
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